what does eye dark circles look like?

Dark circles under the eyes may look purple or blue to dark brown or black, depending on skin color. These circles are rarely a cause for concern, but people may wish to reduce their appearance for cosmetic reasons.

How can you tell if you have dark circles under your eyes?

Dark circles under your eyes happen when the skin beneath both eyes appears darkened. It’s different from bruising around one eye from an injury or redness and swelling in one eye caused by an infection. Dark circles under your eyes usually are not a sign of a medical problem.

What is the actual cause of dark circles?

Dark circles under the eyes are usually caused by being tired. Sometimes, what appear to be dark circles under your eyes may merely be shadows cast by puffy eyelids or hollows under your eyes that develop as a normal part of aging.

Can dark circles go away?

There are a number of methods — both natural and medically prescribed — that people use to get rid of, or lessen the appearance of, dark circles under their eyes. Although not all of these treatments are permanent, with maintenance and consistency they will help reduce the appearance of dark circles.

Is dark circles permanent?

Dark circles are likely to become more noticeable and permanent with age. This is because as people get older, their skin loses collagen, becoming thinner and more translucent.

How do you lighten dark circles?

Treatment
  1. Apply a cold compress. A cold compress can help reduce swelling and shrink dilated blood vessels. …
  2. Get extra sleep. Catching up on sleep can also help reduce the appearance of dark circles. …
  3. Elevate your head. …
  4. Soak with tea bags. …
  5. Conceal with makeup.

Why do I look like I have black eyes?

Allergic shiners, also called allergic facies or periorbital venous congestion, are a symptom of allergies. They appear as dark circles under the eyes and resemble bruises or “black eyes.” Allergic shiners are caused by the pooling of blood under the eyes, due to the swelling of the tissue in the nasal cavities.